Script Supervising: What is it?

Role Call: Script Supervising

What is a script supervisor?

In simple terms, a script supervisor is someone on set who oversees the script.

In more complicated terms, a script supervisor could only have the responsibility of writing which takes were good and bad – or it could be so much more. A script supervisor could be in charge of continuity including costumes and props, and the actions of an actor in a scene. 

The primary function of the script supervisor is to provide detailed notes about takes to the editor. This not only saves time, but prevents the editor from slopping through every single take – it also prevents from many headaches.

When you are taking notes as a script supervisor, you need to take note of the following:

Are the actors saying their lines correctly? – this is especially important when working with a client who has a specific script. 

How are the takes? You should write down the scene, and how it was. When working on personal projects, good takes are always labeled “money $$$” but for more professional productions, it would be wise to label it “good take” or something shorter – especially in the case of quick resets.

Here’s an example from Paramount’s “I Married a Witch”

i married a witch.jpg

What should I write?

and any other identifying information that tells the editor what he or she’s working with. Here’s an example of what you should write for each take:

SCENE: 5

SHOT: A

TAKE: 2

TIME CODE: 09:12:22 (hour:minute:second)

NOTES: It was a good shot

That’s about as simple as notes can be. Details differ from set to set.  

What’s the key to taking good notes as a script supervisor? Remember these key things:

GOOD HANDWRITING

CONCISE NOTES

ORGANIZED NOTES

Also remember: whatever you can do to make the editor’s life more easy, the better.

Leave a Reply